Those of us who like to cook up a storm will lavish no end of attention on a meal. So it’s not surprising that the visual chefs of the world, the artists and designers, have turned their talents to the platforms we provide to serve up the goodies.  Picasso took to creating dishy plates fairly late in his career, and as usual he did it entirely his own way.  Above from him found here.

Mr P turned his hand to plate making over and over and generated a pile of amazing work, including this great one with a couple of dozen petit visages that was up for auction, reported by the London Telegraph. 

After he was done making all the plates, Picasso, always willing to help around the house, moved on to jugs like this cutie seen here.  (a previous RofL post had reason to present a fish jug by PP).

The creation and construction of wonderful plates for our food or just feasting our eyes has a long tradition and master practitioners in every era.  The above was made about 1460 somewhere in Spain and is now residing (see here) in the wonderful Musee des arts Decoratifs in Paris.

This swell bird (“Coq”) plate also lives in the Musee des arts Decoratifs (well worth a visit, we think). It is the work of Jacques Besnard in 1930. Find it here  and be sure to look around the site for much more.

You say plates, we say Fornasetti, namely Piero Fornasetti (1913 – 1988) the incomparable Italian designer who put his signature style–and often this particular woman’s face–on all sorts of household goods, including plates. They are still available and still much loved.  The three above can be had at Barney’s, go here.

Well, you take a current design star like David Chipperfield and ask him to create a line of dishes and cups for Alessi and here’s what you get: a lovely tribute to one of our favourite artists, Giorgio Morandi, seen here.   More on Mr Morandi in this NYT article.  More on Mr Chipperfield in the RofL library here.

The Dutch de stijl movement from the first half of the 20th century continues to inspire designers.  The above set of plates borrows–or steals, say the designers, London retailer Darkroom–the strong colour and shape from the movement, which was also applied to textiles and paper goods.  Found here.

This nifty plate is from a design by Nikolai Suetin done in the so-called Suprematist style in 1905, auctioned recently, and reported here.

When the world was black and white and the smart set chowed down in the living room wearing the same clothes they wore to the office, plates came in lots of shapes and sizes and colours to handle the new trends, like fondue, crab dip, and miniature marshmallow/pineapple cube salad.  Go back here.

Jetting back to our own time, we seem quite comfortable dishing food out on both the exquisite and the goofball, sometimes in the same meal.  This swedish bear plate found here.  What do you think you’d serve on that?  Gumballs and goat cheese croquettes?

And this from our youth is a fine depiction of the  magnificent Hopalong Cassidy  on a plate by  Kimmerle Milnazik discovered at the unforgettable Plate Lady website.  No question what you’d serve up here: fresh carrots and sugar cubes, we reckon.

Just a few more in the cupboard.  Above jaunty thing is by a remarkable American artist Howard Kottler, found here.   More of him to be found at the Smithsonian Institute.

And we complete the meal with another American artist Molly Hatch who, among other things designs plates in groups so you only see the whole picture when they are all together–say on your large dining table or here.

If you care about food, we think you should care about what you put the food on, whether it is a blank white canvas or a handsome cowboy.  If we are what we eat, maybe we are also, a little bit, what we eat OFF.